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NOVA Chicago/Turabian Citation Style Guide   Tags: chicago, citation, cite  

This guide will help you cite the most common types of materials required in research papers and projects. - Guide by Natalie Clewell. Direct comments to nclewell@nvcc.edu.
Last Updated: Mar 19, 2014 URL: http://nova.libguides.com/ChicagoTurabian Print Guide Email Alerts

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Using this Chicago/Turabian Guide

This guide was created to help you format your papers using the Chicago/Turabian citation style. A citation style tells you how your paper should be arranged, and how to give credit to resources such as books and articles both in the text of your paper, and in your works cited page.  Chicago has two styles for documentation -- Documentation I and Documentation II.  Documentation I uses footnotes/endnotes and Documentation II uses in-text citation.  Check with your instructor to find out which style is preferred.  This guide currently shows Documentation II...for Documentation I, see Diana Hacker's guide.

How to Navigate Tabs

Find formatting and in-text citation help below.

 

Formatting Your Chicago/Turabian Paper

Chicago/Turabian formatted papers may have either a cover page or your instructor may ask for your information at the top of the first page of your paper. Check with your instructor to ensure you are formatting your paper properly based on their instructions.

Cover Page

Chicago/Turabian Formatted Title Page

Information obtained from:

Clements, Jessica, Elizabeth Angeli, Karen Schiller, S.C. Gooch, Laurie Pinkert, and Allen Brizee. 2001. "General Format." The Purdue OWL, October 12. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/13/

 

In-Text Citations (Documentation II)

Below are 3 ways that you can provide an in-text citation:

1. Use a signal phrase and a quote. A signal phrase introduces the author in a lead in sentence with a quote, and then places the publication year and page number at the end.

Ex.: Pollan explains that "the apple, like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American" (2001,13).

2. Use a direct quote. A direct quote places the author, publication year and page number in parenthesis at the end.

Ex.: "In effect, the apple like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American" (Pollan 2001, 13).

3. Use a signal phrase and a paraphrase. A signal phrase introduces the author in the sentence, and rather than quote the author directly, you restate the author's ideas in your own words. This is followed by the publication year and page number in parenthesis.

Ex.: Michael Pollan compares the apple to the settler, because both required an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience (2001, 13).

All of these in-text citations would correspond to a citation on your works cited page for:

Pollan, Michael. 2001. The Botany of Desire. New York: Random House.

 

Formatting Your References Page

How to Format Your Chicago/Turabian References Page

 

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